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Ryan Campbell
Ryan Campbell

White Potato



For example, a cup of potatoes has a similar effect on blood sugar as a can of cola or a handful of jelly beans. [2, 3] The roller-coaster-like effect of a high dietary glycemic load can result in people feeling hungry again soon after eating, which may then lead to overeating. [4*]




white potato



A similar long-term study found that high potato and French fry intakes were linked to a greater risk of diabetes in women, and that replacing potatoes with whole grains could lower diabetes risk. [9]


Adults should consume between 2 and 3 cups of vegetables daily, recommends the United States Department of Agriculture. Some of your vegetable intake can come from starchy vegetables, including sweet potatoes or white potatoes. Despite their similar classification by the USDA, sweet potatoes and white potatoes have a number of nutritional differences, with sweet potatoes offering greater nutritional benefits.


Both sweet potatoes and white potatoes provide a rich source of starch and dietary fiber. As you'd expect from foods classified as starchy vegetables, potatoes and sweet potatoes both contain large amounts of starch per serving -- 10 grams per cup of white potato or 16.8 grams per an equivalent serving of sweet potato. Your body breaks down this starch into simple sugars, and utilizes the resulting glucose as a source of energy. Sweet potatoes and potatoes also contain dietary fiber, indigestible carbohydrate that helps you feel full after a meal. Each cup of white potato provides 1.8 grams of fiber, while an equivalent serving of sweet potato provides 4 grams. Choose sweet potatoes to maximize your dietary fiber intake.


Sweet potato and white potato differ drastically in their vitamin A content. Sweet potatoes are among the richest sources of beta-carotene, a nutrient your body converts to vitamin A after consumption. Each cup of chopped sweet potato provides 18,869 international units, or IU, of vitamin A, compared to only 6 IU in white potato. Since adult men and women require 3,000 or 2,333 IU of vitamin A daily, respectively, according to the Linus Pauling Institute, even a small serving of sweet potato provides your entire daily required intake of the nutrient. Choose sweet potato over white potato for its vitamin A content to benefit your vision, immune system and the health of your skin.


Sweet potatoes offer a minor nutritional advantage over white potatoes due to their slightly higher potassium content. Each cup of white potato contains 305 milligrams of potassium, or 7 percent of the recommended daily intake, according to the Linus Pauling Institute. An equal serving of sweet potato contains 448 milligrams, or approximately 10 percent of your recommended intake. The potassium from both types of potato nourishes your nervous and muscular systems, as well as supports your metabolism.


Sweet potatoes substitute for white potatoes in many recipes. Like regular potatoes, sweet potatoes can be baked, mashed or roasted for healthy side dishes. Always serve your sweet potatoes along with a source of fat to facilitate vitamin A absorption -- the vitamin dissolves in the fat from your meal, then gets absorbed by your intestines along with fat droplets. Add healthy fat to your meal by lightly coating roasted sweet potatoes with olive oil, or by drizzling a teaspoon of olive oil over your baked or mashed sweet potatoes.


Kennebec White Potato is the gold standard for frying potatoes. Dark brown skin with ivory white interior. High starch content makes for great storage. A great all-around potato! Solanum tuberosum. Determinate. Mid season maturity, 90 days. Blue Tag Certified.


Kennebec White Potato is the go-to variety for making french fries and homemade potato chips. This white potato variety produces heavy yields of large, oblong potatoes. Kennebecs have a dark brown outside with a slightly bumpy texture. The interior flesh is ivory-white with a high starch content that makes it store very well. Although this variety is best known for its frying applications, it is a great all-around potato. It works excellent for baking, mashing and roasting as well!


Potatoes are poked with a fork to prevent steam from building up inside of the skins. A potato can explode (and make a big mess of your oven) if steam builds up! Poke each potato about 5-6 times making sure you pierce the skin.


If you want softer skin, wrap the potatoes in aluminum foil before they go in the oven. This helps to steam the skin keeping it from crisping up as much. I prefer crispy skin so I do not wrap them in foil!


When making something that needs baked potatoes, I always do a half microwave/half oven method to speed things up a tad! Just poke a few fork holes them, then microwave the potatoes for half the time it would take to completely finish in microwave. Then, I take out the microwave, pour/rub some olive oil and sea salt on them.. and stick in the oven! Slightly quicker way to have done and still get that yummier oven baked taste!!!! FYI- the potato that I scoop out.. I just stick in a ziplock bag and press all the air out of it.. date it, and stick in the fridge or freezer. Anyone can use it for quick and delish mashed potatoes, potato pancakes/fritters, or for a potato soup as mentioned above! Delish recipe!


Quality: Select small to medium-size maturepotatoes of ideal quality for cooking. Tubers storedbelow 45ºF may discolor when canned. Choosepotatoes 1 to 2 inches in diameter if they are to bepacked whole.


Procedure: Wash and peel potatoes. Place inascorbic acid solution to prevent darkening. Ifdesired, cut into 1/2-inch cubes. Drain. Cook 2minutes in boiling water and drain again. For wholepotatoes, boil 10 minutes and drain. Add 1 teaspoonof salt per quart to the jar, if desired. Fill jars with hot prepared potatoes, leaving no more than 1-inch headspace. Cover hot potatoes with FRESH boiling water, leaving 1-inch headspace and covering all pieces of potato. (Caution: Do not use the water you cooked the potatoes in; it contains too much starch.)


A soul-food favorite and a Chesapeake tradition dating back to colonial days, Maryland White Potato Pie is a bright and beautiful take on the simple potato with a healthy helping of sweetness and a ripping citrus zest.


Although they share the same name, sweet potatoes, and white potatoes are botanically unrelated; sweet potatoes are from the Convolvulaceae plant family, while white potatoes come from the Solanaceae plant family. Sweet potatoes are relative to morning glories, other vines, trees, and shrubs, while white potatoes are relative to nightshade vegetables such as tomatoes, peppers, and eggplants. For this reason, sweet potatoes and white potatoes offer different nutrients, vitamins, and minerals.


White potatoes come in shades of brown, yellow, and red, with white or yellow flesh, while sweet potatoes are typically orange in color, however, are also found in yellow, purple, and red varieties. Although, in some countries, sweet potatoes are referred to as yams, they are also a different species of plant. (1)


Nutritionally speaking, both sweet potatoes and white potatoes are good sources of nutrients, vitamins, and minerals. Here is a nutrition comparison of 100 grams of baked sweet potato vs. white potato. (2)(3)


Carbohydrates: A 100-gram serving of baked sweet potato contains 21.0 grams of carbohydrates and a 100-gram serving of baked white potato contains 21.5 grams of carbohydrates, making it a virtual tie.


Fiber: A 100-gram serving of baked sweet potato contains 3.3 grams of fiber and a 100-gram serving of baked white potato contains 2.1 grams of fiber, making sweet potato the winner by a slight margin.


Sugar: A 100-gram serving of baked sweet potato contains 6.5 grams of sugar and a 100-gram serving of baked white potato contains 1.4 grams of sugar, making white potato the winner by a small margin.


While sweet potatoes and white potatoes are nutritionally similar in terms of their calorie, protein, fat, and carbohydrate content, they do differ slightly in their micronutrient content, namely in their vitamin A content.


Generally speaking, both sweet potatoes and white potatoes are dense sources of nutrients, each providing a wide variety of vitamins and minerals, however, sweet potatoes provide 384% of the recommended daily value of vitamin A, while white potatoes provide 0%. With that said, white potatoes do provide more folate, niacin, phosphorus, and potassium per serving, while other values remain quite similar. (2)(3)


The glycemic index ranking of a potato is dependent on the type of potato and how it was prepared. For example, boiled sweet potatoes have a GI ranking of 44, while boiled white potatoes have a GI ranking of 54, and baked sweet potatoes have a GI ranking of 94, and baked white potatoes have a GI ranking of 73. (4)


The glycemic load ranking of a potato is also dependent on the type of potato and how it was prepared. For example, boiled sweet potatoes have a GL ranking of 11, while boiled white potatoes have a GL ranking of 14, and baked sweet potatoes have a GL ranking of 10, and baked white potatoes have a GL ranking of 17. (4)


Overall, given the glycemic index is ranked on a scale of 100, the differences between sweet potatoes and white potatoes are minimal, not to mention, both sweet and white potatoes fall mid-range in terms of glycemic load.


Although sweet potatoes do contain more fiber, vitamin A, vitamin C, and manganese, white potatoes contain slightly less sugar, more starch, and more folate. Sweet potatoes tend to have a lower glycemic index and glycemic load when boiled, however, white potatoes have a lower glycemic index when baked. Overall, sweet potatoes and white potatoes are nutritionally very similar in terms of calorie, protein, and fat content per serving, as well as contain similar values of B vitamins, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, iron, and copper. 041b061a72


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